Walter Scott Building

The Walter Scott Building in Moose Jaw

The Walter Scott Building is a Municipal Heritage Property comprising two commercial lots near the centre of Moose Jaw’s historic downtown commercial district. The property features a six-storey office building faced with brick and Tyndall Stone, located on the northeast corner of Main and High Streets.

Designed by the prominent Regina architectural firm of Storey and Van Egmond, the building features a main floor clad in Tyndall Stone, with upper stories clad in a distinctive raked rough-faced brick from Minnesota.

Constructed by the Moose Jaw Times Herald the building was the largest commercial office building in the province at the time of its completion in 1912. Featuring the latest construction techniques, including the use of reinforced concrete with Turner Mushroom support columns that flare at the top to provide support for the floors, the building was touted as Moose Jaw’s first “fireproof” office building. The building’s location in the heart of down town Moose Jaw, combined its size and new construction techniques, which presented an image of modernity, made it a desirable address for the city’s business and professional elite.

The heritage value of the property also lies in its association with Walter Scott. Scott entered the local business community in 1894 when he added the Moose Jaw Times-Herald to his newspaper holdings. He owned the newspaper for over twenty years, during which time the company commissioned the construction of the property. Scott was also active in politics, representing the area in the Legislature of the North-West Territories and, in 1905, forming the first government of Saskatchewan and serving as premier until his retirement in 1916. In recognition of his public service and association with the Times-Herald, the building was named in his honour.

St. Aiden’s Anglican Church

St. Aiden’s Anglican Church in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan

The present building is the third Anglican church to be constructed on the property, the first having been erected in 1888. Continuing the tradition of its predecessors, St. John’s has been the focal point of Anglican worship in Moose Jaw since it was built in 1909.

The bells of the church were used as the community’s fire alarm and emergency signal early in the twentieth century. The church also houses a memorial to the soldiers of the locally-formed 46th Canadian Battalion, displaying two white oak Vimy Crosses which commemorate the sacrifices made by the battalion during the 1917 Battle of Vimy Ridge.

Designed by Regina architect F. Clapman Clemesha, the Gothic Revival style can be observed in the numerous lancet windows, buttresses, stone copings and the pointed-arch aisle vaulting in the nave. Also contributing to the Gothic Revival architecture is the church’s seventy-foot, crenellation-topped tower, which contains a carillon of nine bells, nine lancet windows and four corner pilasters.

Claybank Brick Plant

Claybank Brick Plant outside of Claybank, SaskatchewanClaybank Brick Plant outside of Claybank, SaskatchewanClaybank Brick Plant outside of Claybank, SaskatchewanClaybank Brick Plant outside of Claybank, SaskatchewanClaybank Brick Plant outside of Claybank, SaskatchewanClaybank Brick Plant outside of Claybank, SaskatchewanClaybank Brick Plant outside of Claybank, SaskatchewanClaybank Brick Plant outside of Claybank, SaskatchewanClaybank Brick Plant outside of Claybank, SaskatchewanClaybank Brick Plant outside of Claybank, SaskatchewanClaybank Brick Plant outside of Claybank, SaskatchewanClaybank Brick Plant outside of Claybank, SaskatchewanClaybank Brick Plant outside of Claybank, SaskatchewanClaybank Brick Plant outside of Claybank, SaskatchewanClaybank Brick Plant outside of Claybank, SaskatchewanClaybank Brick Plant outside of Claybank, SaskatchewanClaybank Brick Plant outside of Claybank, SaskatchewanClaybank Brick Plant outside of Claybank, SaskatchewanClaybank Brick Plant outside of Claybank, SaskatchewanClaybank Brick Plant outside of Claybank, SaskatchewanClaybank Brick Plant outside of Claybank, SaskatchewanClaybank Brick Plant outside of Claybank, SaskatchewanClaybank Brick Plant outside of Claybank, SaskatchewanClaybank Brick Plant outside of Claybank, SaskatchewanClaybank Brick Plant outside of Claybank, SaskatchewanClaybank Brick Plant outside of Claybank, SaskatchewanClaybank Brick Plant outside of Claybank, SaskatchewanClaybank Brick Plant outside of Claybank, SaskatchewanClaybank Brick Plant outside of Claybank, SaskatchewanClaybank Brick Plant outside of Claybank, SaskatchewanClaybank Brick Plant outside of Claybank, SaskatchewanClaybank Brick Plant outside of Claybank, SaskatchewanClaybank Brick Plant outside of Claybank, SaskatchewanClaybank Brick Plant outside of Claybank, SaskatchewanClaybank Brick Plant outside of Claybank, SaskatchewanClaybank Brick Plant outside of Claybank, SaskatchewanClaybank Brick Plant outside of Claybank, SaskatchewanClaybank Brick Plant outside of Claybank, SaskatchewanClaybank Brick Plant outside of Claybank, Saskatchewan

Claybank Brick Plant was a brickworks factory for the manufacturing of bricks from clay located with a quarry for clay on site. The Claybank Brick plant has been conserved as a part of Saskatchewan’s industrial heritage with its official announcement June 29, 1997 as a National Historic Site of Canada by Minister of Canadian Heritage Sheila Copps. $2 million for the conservation and presentation of the Brick Plant by Claybank was contributed jointly between Federal and Provincial Government funding departments.

Claybank Brick Plant used neighboring clay from the Massold Clay Canyons. The Cretaceous period resulted in the Whitemud Formation which is the underlying zone of the Claybank Hills. The Whitemud Formation is noted for two main types of clay; white and grey in colour which possess different properties. Also close to Claybank are the Dirt Hills where a “bentonitic clay” can be found. Therefore, the brick produced is used for different purposes. Claybank Brick Plant is known for its face brick, as well as tiles, fire brick, insulating brick

The Scotiabank Saddledome

Calgary's Scotiabank Saddledome

Located on the Stampede Grounds, the Saddledome was built in 1983 to replace the Stampede Corral as the home of the Calgary Flames of the National Hockey League, and to host ice hockey and figure skating at the 1988 Winter Olympics. Today the arena is also home to the Calgary Hitmen of the Western Hockey League and the Calgary Roughnecks of the National Lacrosse League.

The facility also hosts concerts, conferences and other sporting championships, and events for the Calgary Exhibition and Stampede. It underwent a major renovation in 1994–95 and sold its naming rights, during which its original name of Olympic Saddledome was changed to Canadian Airlines Saddledome. The facility was given the name Pengrowth Saddledome in 2000, after Pengrowth Management Ltd. signed a ten-year agreement. It adopted its current name in October 2010 as Scotiabank signed on as title sponsor.

Imperial Bank of Canada

The Imperial Bank of Canada Building in Calgary

The Imperial Bank of Canada is a two-storey building situated along downtown Calgary’s historic Stephen Avenue Mall. It embodies the Neoclassical architectural style and features a rough-faced sandstone exterior, decorative sandstone shields, a roofline cornice underlined by block modillions, and a parapet.

Between 1886 and 1887, the I. G. Baker Company collaborated with businessmen John Lineham and Matthew Dunn to erect two adjacent, identical sandstone buildings in Calgary’s rapidly developing downtown core. The Imperial Bank of Canada (IBC) acquired one of the two buildings in 1892. Between 1909 and 1911, nationally renowned Toronto architects Frank Darling and John Pearson and locally significant architects Hodgson, Bates, and Beatty radically altered the structure, converting the IBC from a fairly simple building to an impressive embodiment of Neoclassical architectural ideals.

Sawback Picnic Area

Sawback is a small picnic area on the Bow Valley Parkway between Banff and Johnston Canyon.  It used to be small and has gotten smaller since Parks Canada has moved the tables near to the roadside turn off and allowed the vegetation to take over old picnic areas.  This is what it looked like now.

A visit to Sawback Picnic Area near Johnston Canyon in Banff National Park

That isn’t what got me so excited as a kid.  There was a babbling brook that I always had a blast in.  It couldn’t have gone anywhere.  So I wandered down a path until I heard something babbling.

A visit to Sawback Picnic Area near Johnston Canyon in Banff National Park

Exactly what I remembered.  Of course the boys did what I used to do and is jump over it and get themselves wet.

A visit to Sawback Picnic Area near Johnston Canyon in Banff National Park

I told Mark that an old Cooper family tradition was to dunk your head into the stream.  The tradition went back decades.  He put his hand into the glacier cold water and screamed but he did dunk his head in it.A visit to Sawback Picnic Area near Johnston Canyon in Banff National ParkA visit to Sawback Picnic Area near Johnston Canyon in Banff National ParkA visit to Sawback Picnic Area near Johnston Canyon in Banff National Park

After he nearly became hypothermic did I tell him that he was the first Cooper to ever do it.  He wasn’t impressed.A visit to Sawback Picnic Area near Johnston Canyon in Banff National ParkA visit to Sawback Picnic Area near Johnston Canyon in Banff National ParkA visit to Sawback Picnic Area near Johnston Canyon in Banff National ParkA visit to Sawback Picnic Area near Johnston Canyon in Banff National ParkA visit to Sawback Picnic Area near Johnston Canyon in Banff National ParkA visit to Sawback Picnic Area near Johnston Canyon in Banff National ParkA visit to Sawback Picnic Area near Johnston Canyon in Banff National ParkA visit to Sawback Picnic Area near Johnston Canyon in Banff National Park

The Bow

The Bow in Calgary

No wonder it is being called the best new skyscraper in Canada. 

The Bow is a 158,000-square-metre (1,700,000 sq ft) office building for the headquarters of Encana Corporation and Cenovus Energy, in downtown Calgary. Designed by Foster and Partners, the building is currently the second tallest office tower in Calgary, and second tallest in Canada outside Toronto. The Bow is also considered the start of redevelopment in Calgary’s Downtown East Village. It was completed in 2012 and was ranked among the top 10 architectural projects of that year according to Azure Magazine.

Posts navigation

1 2 3 4 5 6